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Tidal flow lanes

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Traffic

reversible lane signAlso called reversible lanes. A reversible lane (called a counterflow lane or contraflow lane in transport engineering nomenclature) is a lane in which traffic may travel in either direction, depending on certain conditions.

Typically, it is meant to improve traffic flow during rush hours, by having overhead traffic lights and lighted street signs notify drivers which lanes are open or closed to driving or turning.

Best example is the golden gate bridge in San Francisco.

Golden gate reversible lanes

You can even convert divided highways to have dedicated reversible lanes

highway reversible lanes

Where can we try this in Bangalore? My options

  1. BETL highway (on top)
  2. Whitefield road (remove dividers)

Both the roads are built as 4 lanes, you could have 3+1 or you could convert them to 3 lanes with shoulders and have 2+1

What are your options?

Comments

roshanrk's picture

Would people here be

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Would people here be disciplined enough to drive on the right lane always? Such initiatives would require a lot of discipline amongst the drivers for it to be successful. We cannot have cops always monitoring it.

Is there a way this is enforced in other cities?

Naveen's picture

Our Problems Need Our Solutions

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Quite Right.

These measures are possible in countries where people are highly disciplined, such as in Europe, N.America, Japan, etc.In this country, people do not follow well marked road dividing signs (dividers need to be solid concrete walls), traffic signal lights need cops else they jump signals the moment the cop turns his back, motorists run down pedestrians, pedestrians never bother to step aside even if there is enough room, vehicles drive in the opposite directions on one-ways & even over the side-walks...... the list goes on & on.

It's one thing to see & appreciate how well organized the system works in most places overseas, but bringing in such discipline is quite another in a country where the majority still does not have two square meals a day & life is hard even for those who are well employed as there are so many in just one city with scarce infratructure & resources.

Rithesh's picture

Too much to expect :(

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Roshan, Naveen

Reversible lanes concept is tough to implement here -

1. The number of lanes are less.
2. Illegal parkings almost always block one lane on both sides.
3. The lanes itself are much narrower than they should actually be - the concept we follow here is - draw a lane separator marking and increase the number of lanes - haha!!! Ring road is a perfect example.. it is actually just enough to be called a 4 lane road - but with the paints they have made it a 6 lane.
4. "Only my time is important and hence i dont mind breaking rules and screwing up others time" - mentality of our and the cab drivers.


A better alternative would be to reserve one lane for buses (both private and public) on the roads that you have mentioned. Parking in the Whitefield region should be regulated. I have tried enough - wrote letters to RK Mishra (Abide) and traffic police - nothing has changed.
blrpraj's picture

reversible lanes won't work

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reversible lanes as many have pointed out works in a highly disciplined society. The discipline is not limited to the persons using the system. discipline is required on the part of folks maintaining the system so that this system operates like clockwork without "confusion"   Reading road signage (and following what they direct) and following lane markings are a cultural way of life in many countries that folks have given as an example where reversible lanes work. 
Another exapmple of reversible lanes in on I-90 in seattle which I have used a lot, it has hardly failed and works with clockwork precision...the consequences of something not working due to somebodies negligence is disastrous.
Having said all this I do not think reversible lanes is a feasible solution in the Indian environment, good only on paper. 
idontspam's picture

This can help

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Apparently this is being discussed for Bangalore

The below zipper machine can help put up dividers. read more about it here

zipper machine

There are also plastic collapsible dividers (like the tubes we use in bangalore) available which can be controlled from a central location. The reversible lane can also be a bus lane + car pool lane.

Srivatsava's picture

Being implemented at Hosur Road Elevated Road.

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I read in December (possibly a TOI article) that this was being tried at Hosur Road Elevated Road (BETL).Strangely, that article reported that the road was 6-lane wide, and will be used in 4+2 lane configuration during peak hours and 3+3 during non-peak hours.


If it is indeed a four lane road, then does it make sense to operate a 3+1 configuration? Who would pay a toll to travel on a single lane road?? Its better to make it four lanes in one direction ( Yes, a PH one way!!). That will fetch them more vehicles and hence more revenue. And makes sense for the users as well!!


-Srivatsava V
http://srivatsava-vajapey...

-Srivatsava V

asj's picture

Want a Desi example - try Mumbai

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Hughes road, Mumbai - this system is in operation for nearly 30 years on this stretch. One south bound lane becomes north bound in the evening - all they do is put traffic cones and ensure one policeman is at the either end.

ASJ

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